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Sør-reaksjoner på Rio+20

 

 

ASIA PACIFIC PEOPLES’ DECLARATION ON RIO+20


The Declaration is the outcome document of the Asia-Pacific Research Network (APRN) Biennial Conference “Rio for People: Strengthening People’s Capacity for Genuine Sustainable Development” on June 4-7, 2012. It was co-organized with IBON International as part of the global Rights for Sustainability (R4S) campaign. It was held in Hanoi, Vietnam with the assistance of local members SRD, S-CODE, and MSD. Organizations interested to endorse or become signatory to the Declaration may contact APRN at secretariat@aprnet.org

We, 83 representatives of civil society organizations from 18 countries in Asia Pacific gathered twenty years after the first Earth Summit in 1992 fully aware that the world is farther than ever from reaching the goals of sustainable development.

Our world today is locked in environmental, social, political, economic, and environmental crises. Resource depletion and biodiversity loss continue at very rapid rates. Air and water pollution from agro-chemical and industrial processes continue to cause serious economic, social, and health problems. Greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, causing dangerous climate change. The world’s richest 10 per cent soak up over half of the world’s income, while 2.5 billion people in the South live on less than $2 a day. People in wealthy countries consume as much as ten times more natural resources than those in poorer countries, while in the South, 1 billion are hungry, 1.6 billion have no access to electricity, and over 1 billion have no access to clean water.

Clearly, worst affected are the poor in the South who did little in causing them. This is not the world Rio envisioned.

Rio+20 should learn from the failure of the prevailing system of development multiple crises that our planet finds itself in. We know this system to be one where economic and natural resources are used to accumulate wealth for the few who control them rather than serve the common good of society; a system based on the unrestricted exploitation of the poor, women and the environment for corporate profits; a system where a few powerful countries write the rules of global trade, finance, and environmental action in the interest of their corporations and banks, harming the environment and peoples in the South. We know it to be a failed system from which we need to break. We need system change.

We believe, however, that the Green Economy agenda will not allow us to break from this failed system as it follows primarily the profit-oriented logic of corporate and financial interest. It assumes that solutions to unsustainable development are in the hands of corporations – the main agents of unsustainable development – through their “green” investments, innovations and technologies, systems and policies, and mechanisms such as trading of carbon, forests and biodiversity, and water. Numerous experiences prove that these corporate “solutions” do not solve the problems they purport to address but worsen them. They trample on people’s rights

through further privatization, commodification and financialization of nature and ecosystem functions, which lead to the further concentration of control over nature, land-grabs, bio- piracy, displacement and marginalization of communities most dependent on access to these resources, and loss of cultural identities, languages, and traditional systems, values, and principles. It also gives rise to violent oppression of people’s resistance.
 
The promise of green jobs in the green economy and corporate social responsibility are being used to deceive workers anew into accepting wage exploitation in new “green” industries, obscuring the truth that many of these so-called green businesses are neither ecologically sound nor socially just such as the production of biofuels, nuclear plants, construction of large-scale dams, etc. The promotion of green cities takes away the emphasis of equitable development between rural and urban areas and further exacerbates urban drift.

We decry attempts by powerful States, especially the North, to whittle down human rights obligations and equity principles in the Rio+20 outcome document in order to avoid concrete commitments to meaningful reforms in social, economic, and environmental policies. On the other hand, they are pushing for corporate-led investments and initiatives to fill the gap left by government inaction. We assert that States should not backtrack, but instead uphold and build upon the Rio principles and internationally agreed human rights norms and standards, most importantly, the principle of common but differentiated responsibility, the polluters pay principles, the precautionary principle, and the principle on access to information, public participation and justice.

Agenda 21 should be brought up to a binding form of agreement, with strengthened institutions for implementation, monitoring and evaluation that ensure democratic ownership of the process at all levels. National reports have to be made available to the public to allow for informed multi-stakeholder decision-making. There should be a special clause on ecological-economic crimes to assure economic, social and ecological justice.

We assert that sustainable development must be based on the observance and fulfillment of human rights norms and standards, including the rights to development, to self- determination, to food, health and water, to education, the rights of women and children, and the right of people to participate in decision-making. We pledge to struggle for genuine sustainable development beyond Rio+20.




ANNEX

Adressing specific issues:

On poverty eradication

Poverty is the result of the unequal distribution of power, assets and opportunities within and between countries. Thus poverty eradication is about the empowerment of the poor to claim their rights. They must take ownership and control of their natural resources and productive assets and use them to gear their economies to fulfill their needs and development aspirations. Decision making for sustainable development should be bottom up, decentralized process owned by people. Active participation of people, communities particularly marginalized sector including women and indigenous peoples in decision making and consultative processes should be promoted at all levels. Equal participation of women and men should be ensured through institutionalizing in law and implementation mechanisms. Institutions of global governance must be radically reformed or replaced so that poor countries are equitably represented. Unequal agreements on trade and investment must be renegotiated or abrogated.
 
Food sovereignty

All people have the right to safe, nutritious, and adequate food. Countries and communities also have the right to access, control, and protect the means of food production and its outcomes, the right to determine their food and agricultural policies at all levels, and the right to develop and maintain systems of food production and distribution that are ecologically sustainable, socially just and culturally appropriate. Agrarian reform must be carried out in order to secure peasants and rural people’s democratic ownership and utilization of land, water resources and seeds, as well as access to finance and infrastructure, and environmentally sound technological support. Food production and trade policies must prioritize domestic food self-sufficiency and the livelihoods of small farmers, fisherfolk, women, peasants, and indigenous people. Trade policies and commercial/business practices must be modified and designed to further such prioritization. Public institutions must also help develop and encourage the adoption of sustainable methods of agriculture which rely on local ecosystems and locally-based knowledge as well as appropriate technologies. Food sovereignty will not be successful without land reform.

Water

Water is not a commodity but a vital need to human survival. All people have the right to sufficient, safe, accessible, and affordable water and sanitation services. Countries and communities are also entitled to develop and maintain water resources, management systems, and facilities to satisfy human and development needs and safeguard their sustainability. The management of water resources must be in public and community control. Water use must be primarily for fulfilling human needs and food production. The right to water and sanitation further requires an explicit focus on the most disadvantaged and marginalized, as well as an emphasis on participation, empowerment, accountability and transparency.

Protection of biodiversity

Biodiversity is essential to the proper functioning of ecosystems and is thus crucial to the right of people to health, food, and a safe and clean environment. The livelihoods of small farmers, fishers, indigenous people, and women also directly depend on biodiversity and their access to genetic resources. They have developed local resource management systems and conserve most of the world’s biodiversity. Biodiversity protection must be based on protecting people’s access to land, water and seeds. The extent of biodiversity’s importance is, however, very poorly understood, and the adverse impacts of changes are thus not properly mitigated. The rapid loss of biodiversity is due mainly to the growing control of corporations over genetic resources as well as over land, water, and forests for industrial agriculture, logging and mining. Thus biodiversity protection must be based on protecting people’s access to land, water and seeds. Biodiversity is a vital part of human nature. It is also an integral part of the heritage of indigenous people and thus their right to self- determination must be recognized, including their right to free and prior informed consent and right to develop their own social and economic systems and retain control of their ancestral lands, traditional knowledge and genetic resources. These rights must be restored equally to women and men. Natural resources and conservation should be taken care of through community knowledge-based decision making and decentralized eco-system based local systems.

Climate change
 
Climate change is worsening environmental damage and is exacerbating the negative effects of poor current practice. It undermines a wide range of human rights both of present and future generations, and threatens to push people deeper into poverty and underdevelopment. The world has to transition away from the fossil-fuel based profit driven economy and abandon unsustainable patterns of manufacture, energy, agriculture and transportation that are behind ever-rising greenhouse gas emissions. But there is a need to expose not just the economic, social, and environmental impacts of oil and gas exploration and extraction, but also that of alleged alternatives such as large-scale hydropower, nuclear, agro-fuels, clean coal, geo-engineering, and so on. The precautionary principle must be applied and international financing institutions, multilateral and bilateral agencies must remove subsidies and policy support for these projects. In the case of hydropower, Rio+20 must make a strong stipulation that dams should show full compliance to the standards set by the World Commission on Dams, and that large dams should absolutely be kept out of the CDM.

The Global North has to take the lead in mitigation efforts by making rapid and drastic emissions cuts, and assist poorer countries pay for the costs of their own transition through finance and technology transfer.

Youth and Children

Youth and children are agents of change, and not simply vulnerable victims of social injustices or merely recipients of government welfare. They are the future caretakers of the Earth and the inheritors of the problems we are creating today. But despite being part of the main agenda in the UNCSD 20 years ago, youth and children continue to be marginalized by the unsustainable dominant profit-driven economic system. Lack of access to basic needs and services, such as food, health, education, access to water and sanitation still remain rampant.

Although successful advocacies and campaigns on youth and children are already happening in some parts of Asia, there is still a need for their voices to be heard and given greater importance especially with regard to the climate crisis, if we are to realize genuine sustainable development. To increase the influence and impact that the world’s young people can make to the overall goal of changing the current model that the global economy is hinged on, these efforts must be consolidated and supported through continuous education and mobilization.

Indigenous People

Indigenous peoples of the Asia Pacific reject the corporate green economy and demand the protection and respect of indigenous peoples rights including the affirmation and implementation of the UN declaration of the rights of Indigenous Peoples; the recognition of cultural pillar as the fourth pillar of sustainable development; and the recognition of the distinct contribution of traditional knowledge and diverse local economies to eradicate poverty and promote sustainable development. Sustainable development should support the indigenous peoples’ integrated and holistic framework to sustainable development.

Labor and Social Protection

Every country should commit to foster the national and local production and enterprises supporting small-scale business and producers for sustainable development. Governments should create equal employment opportunities and ensure decent work for all, gender
 
equality, and participation particularly of marginalized groups. States must be obliged to the international human rights standards and principles to protect the rights of migrant workers and their families.

Just and lasting peace


Ensuring social justice is a precondition for peace. Just and lasting peace and security of women is a precondition for sustainable development. Systemic military-industry complex should be dismantled. We call for moratorium / fade-out of military expenditure and shift the budget to health and education.





SIGNATORIES/PARTICIPANTS

A63, Vietnam
All Together in Dignity-Asia
Arab NGO Network for Development
Asia Monitor Resource Center
Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development
Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants
Asia Pacific Research Network
Cat Ba Archipelago Biosphere Reserve, Vietnam
CCRD, Vietnam
Center for Development of Community Initiative and Environment, Vietnam
Center for Development Programs in the Cordilleras, Philippines
Center for Environment and Development, Sri Lanka Center For Human Rights and Development, Mongolia Center for Women’s Resources, Philippines
Centre for Community Economics and Development Consultants, India
Centre for Sustainable Community Development (S-CODE), Vietnam
Centre for Sustainable Development in Mountainous Areas (CSDM), Vietnam
Centre for Sustainable Development Policy Studies, Vietnam Centre for Sustainable Rural Development (SRD), Vietnam CERDA, Vietnam
China Association for NGO Cooperation Climate Change Resilience Centre, Vietnam Coastal Development Partnership, Bangladesh
Consumers International/ CUTS International
Consumers International/ VINASTAS Deccan Development Society, India
Department for International Cooperation, Vietnam
Department of Modeling and Database in Environment, Vietnam Ecumenical Institute for Labor Education and Research, Philippines EquityBD, Bangladesh
Farmer Union, Vietnam
Forestry Project, Vietnam
Forum of Women NGOs of Kyrgyzstan
Green Innovation and Development Centre (GreenID), Vietnam
IBON Foundation, Philippines
IBON International
Institute for Agriculture Environment (IAE), Vietnam
Institute for Motivating Self-Employment, Mongolia
Institute for Reproductive and Family Health – RaFH, Vietnam
Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas
Korean Civil Society Forum for International Development
LDC Watch, Nepal
Live and Learn, Vietnam Nepal Policy Institute NGO Jahon, Tajikistan
Pacific Islands Association of Non-governmental Organizations
PACT, Vietnam
PanNature - People and Nature Reconciliation, Vietnam
Peoples’ Coalition for Food Sovereignty-Asia Peoples’ Movement on Climate Change Reality of Aid Asia Pacific
Roots for Equity, Pakistan
SAHANIVASA, India
Sustainable Development Foundation, Thailand
Tebtebba Foundation, Philippines
The Institute for National and Democratic Studies (INDIES), Indonesia
The Institute for Social Studies (ISS), Vietnam theIDLgroup (East Asia)
Third World Network, Malaysia
UBINIG Policy Advocacy for Development, Bangladesh
Voices for Interactive Choice and Empowerment, Bangladesh
Water for the People Network

--

Peace for Life Secretariat

Tel/Fax: (+632) 9278043

http://www.peaceforlife.org


 

 

 

STATEMENT OF CIVIL SOCIETY IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
ON RIO +20 AND THE GREEN ECONOMY



Defend Life and Peoples 'Rights in Rio +20!
Reject the Green Economy and Commodification of Nature!



The world faces a crisis of civilization in which the global economic system based on the accumulation of capital has broken balance with mother earth. The current model is taking us to the limit, soon arriving at a point where the damage will be having irreversible impacts on and consequences for the peoples of the world.


10% of the world's richest have more than half of the global income and people in rich countries consume ten times more natural resources than in poor countries, while globally, 1 billion people are hungry, 1.6 billion have no access to electricity and more than 1 billion do not have access to safe drinking water.

The current capitalist system has led to the empowerment of transnational corporations that profit from the natural resources and speculate in the financial market, going so far as that out of the 100 largest global economies, more than 40 are trans-national.

The commitments of governments for the reduction of greenhouse gas are by far insufficient, so many regions will suffer under extreme unpredictability, where billions of people will be affected and displaced.

In the midst of this financial, energy, climate, environmental and food crises, the G8, representing the most powerful countries in the world,  with their allies as Brazil and transnational corporations are seeking to save the capitalist system through the imposition of the "green economy", rather than making changes to the structural causes of the crisis.

The civil society of Latin America and the Caribbean states:

On the proposal of the green economy
We denounce that the green economy is still pursuing to the erroneous idea of infinite economic growth in a world that has limits.

We reject the commodification of mother earth - of their life cycles and their functions, as well as payments for "environmental services" to create new financial products for the speculative market.

We denounce the green economy will not put an end to extractive industries, mining, hydrocarbons and the agro-exporting model that will continue to have negative impacts on the environment and the rights of peoples.

The green economy will strengthen the economic power of transnational corporations, being even much more influential than the more developed countries, having also self-protection mechanisms through free trade agreements, such as arbitration systems to protect their investment and future earnings, such as the ICSID.

The imposition of the green economy in Latin America and the Caribbean will be going far behind the achievements of the peoples’ struggles constituted as the right to water, the right to a healthy environment, the sovereignty and self-determination of indigenous peoples, among others.

We support the State of Acre letter signed by thirty civil society organizations in rejection of the commodification of nature and in defense of the territories. We call on the communities in other territories to be alert and to resist implementation of green economy and not to follow the example of the Government of Acre.

Facing the false solutions that are part of the proposal for a green economy, the North should take the initiative to cut greenhouse gas emissions drastically and immediately and comply with its obligations on technology transfer and financing without any conditions. The green economy is a "permit" for large industries polluting the environment.

We denounce the false solutions to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases such as nuclear energy, capture and artificial storage of carbon, GM crops and bio-fuels. Solutions to the problem the planet is facing, are not the application of new technologies, but the transformation of structural policies.

We demand the immediate stop of all projects destructive to mother earth, such as open pit mining, the exploitation of hydrocarbons in ecologically sensitive areas, the mega-projects and the IIRSA projects.

We reject any process of regional integration dominated by the big capital.

Before the negotiations of Rio + 20
We demand from the national governments to actively defend the interests of their peoples in the current negotiating text and assume responsibility for future generations. We demand the governments to not endorse the green economy and to not accept the agreements of the Rio + 20. Governments should ensure that the negotiations will be comprehensive, open and transparent.

We require national governments to defend the right to water, the rights of mother earth and the rights of indigenous peoples as expressed in the resolutions of the Peoples’ Summit on Climate Change (Tiquipaya, 2010).

We affirm the importance of upholding the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, the precautionary principle and the principle of access to information, public participation and justice.

We demand realistic and creative mechanisms such as the creation of a tax on financial transactions. It is necessary to construct instruments at the service of the people, with a system of democratic and transparent governance that promotes inclusive public policies, integration between peoples and a new model of development.

Trans-nationals of the G8, in complicity with the governments, have co-opted the UN system, have taken over the social and ecological discourse, and have greater participation in the Rio + 20 negotiations than civil society. Large private corporations have contaminated the planet most, along with the World Bank and the G20, promoting green economy and continue doing “business as usual”. Rio + 20 negotiations must be " party driven " with more participation of civil society.

Alternative models of the life - alternatives to the green economy
Living well, a holistic approach to the rights of mother earth are an alternative to the model of capitalist development, exploiting mother earth and human beings. We are not owners of the nature: we are part of mother earth and demand respect for her life cycles.

Likewise we demand governments to promote policies to support a genuine sustainable agricultural production and food sovereignty without GMOs, as the only way to stop the advance of transnational corporations profiting from the food production in the planet.

We must generate a new global alternative to the green economy to restore balance with mother earth and establish living well, with complementarity and solidarity between people and guaranty well being.

Build an alternative to the concept of "environmental services" and "natural capital" which only aim to the commodification of nature. Management and integral management of forests, water, land, among other beings of nature is a viable alternative to the philosophy of the green economy.

We demand from governments to comply with the principles of living well, stated in the declaration of civil society at a global level in the Peoples’ Summit on Climate Change Cochabamba, Bolivia, in 2010, in order to not just leaving it a speech, but elaborating specific policies for a gradual transition to overcome capitalism in all its forms.

Immediate joint actions
We call upon the international civil society to build alliances to resist the imposition of the green economy in the region and to build a new model for living well in harmony with mother earth.

The governments, communities, international cooperation and other sectors must prevent the degradation of the environment either directly or indirectly, further violations of human rights and mother earth, (water, air, land),  and must ensure the restoration of the affected areas.

Let’s mobilize towards Rio + 20 in rejection to green economy!

Let’s build alternative models to defend life and achieve the living well!


Brasil
Amazon link (Acre)

Ecuador
PIDHDD – Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo
Frente Popular
CDES – Centro de Derechos Económicos y Sociales

Nicaragua
RENICC  - Fundación Red Nicaraguense de Comercio Comunitario

Honduras
Colectivo

Chile
Plataforma Rio+20

México
Movimiento Migrante Mesoamericana

Colombia
CIASE - Corporación de Investigación y Acción Social y Económica
RLIE – Res Latinoamericana sobre las Industrias Extractivas
ILSA – Instituto Latinoamericano para una Sociedad y un Derecho Alternativos

Perú
Propuesta Ciudadana
Construyendo Puentes
CAOI – Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas

Argentina
Abogados Ambientalistas

Guatemala
Movimiento Tzuk Kim-pop (Guatemala); Centro América por el Diálogo –CAD

R. Dominicana
Alianza ONG

Red regional
Movimiento Independencia, Unidad y Cambio
Equipo de Coordinación, Red Latinoamericana de Deuda, Derechos y Desarrollo  LATINDADD

Bolivia
Academia Diplomática
ACSUR LAS SEGOVIAS
AGRUCO – Agroecología  Universidad Cochabamba
Fundación Agua Sustentable
AIPE - Asociación de Instituciones de Promoción y Educación
AMUPEI - Articulación de Mujeres por la Equidad e Igualdad
AOPEB – Asociación de Organizaciones de Productores Ecológicos de Bolvia
Asamblea del Pueblo Guaraní - APG
Asociación de Guías de Bolivia
Asociación de Regantes de Santa Cruz
Broederlijk Delen
CAFOD - Agencia oficial de la Iglesia Católica de Inglaterra y el País de Gales para el desarrollo y la ayuda en casos de emergencia
CCGTT-  Concejo de Capitanes Guaraní y Tapiete de Tarija
CDES - Centro de Derechos Económicos y Sociales
CEADESC - Centro de Estudios Aplicados a los Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales
CEDLA – Centro de Estudios para el Desarrollo Laboral Agrario
CEEDI - Centro de Estudios Ecológicos y Desarrollo Integral
CEJIS – Centro de Estudios Jurídicos e Investigación Social
CENDA – Centro de Comunicación y Desarrollo Andino
COB – Central Obrera Boliviana
Centro para la Democracia
CEPA -  Centro de Ecología y Pueblos Andinos.
CESA – Centro de Servicios Agropecuarios
CESU – Centro de Estudios Superiores Universitarios
CIDEM – Centro de Información y Desarrollo de la Mujeres
CIOEC-  Coordinadora de Integración de Organizaciones Económicas Campesinas Indígenas Originarias de Bolivia
CIPCA – Centro de Investigación y Promoción del Campesinado
CLADEM – Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer
CODEPIO-BENI  - Consejo Departamental de Pueblos Indígenas Originarios del Beni
Colectivo Cabildeo
CONAMAQ – Consejo Nacional de Ayllus y Marcas del Qullasuyo
CPILAP – Central de Pueblos Indígenas de La Paz
CRHISTIAN AID – Una Agencia Oficial de las Iglesias Británicas e Irlandesas
CSIB – Confederación Sindical de Interculturales de Bolivia
CSUTCB – Confederación Sindical Unica de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia
Democracy Center
FCA-AIS BOLIVIA -
FEDECEP-LP - La Federación Departamental de Centros y Comités Cívicos Provinciales de La Paz
Foro Indígena
FSTMB – Federación Sindical de Trabajadores Mineros de Bolivia
FSUTC-BENI – Federación Sindical Unica de Trabajadores Campesinos del Beni
Fundación CONSTRUIR
Fundación JUBILEO
Fundación SOLON
Fundación Gaia Pacha
GTCC – Grupo de Trabajo Conjunto de Cumbres
HERENCIA - Interdisciplinaria para el Desarrollo Sostenible
IESE – Instituto de Estudios Sociales y Económicos
LIDEMA – Liga de Defensa del Medio Ambiente
MOFISP - Movimiento Femenino Indoamericano Senti-Pensante
OXFAM - GB
Plataforma Boliviana Frente al cambio Climático
Plataforma Energética
PROBIOMA – Productividad Biosfera Medio Ambiente
PRODENA - Prodefensa de la Naturaleza
Programa NINA
Reacción Climática
Red de Comunicaciones Apachita
Red Habitat
REMTE – Red Latinoamericana de Mujeres Transformando la Economía
SERNAP – Servicio Nacional de Areas Protegidas
SOPE - Sociedad Potosina de Ecología
Subcentral TIPNIS – Territorio Indígena del Parque Nacional Isiboro Sécure
TROCAIRE - Agencia Católica Irlandesa para el Desarrollo
UMAVIDA –  Asociación Boliviana Uniendo Manos por la Vida
UMSA – Universidad Mayor de San Andrés
UNICOR – Universidad Cordillera
UNITAS – Unión Nacional de Instituciones para el Trabajo de Acción Social

--

Peace for Life Secretariat

Tel/Fax: (+632) 9278043

http://www.peaceforlife.org



 

 

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STATEMENT OF CIVIL SOCIETY IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
ON RIO +20 AND THE GREEN ECONOMY



Defend Life and Peoples 'Rights in Rio +20!
Reject the Green Economy and Commodification of Nature!



The world faces a crisis of civilization in which the global economic system based on the accumulation of capital has broken balance with mother earth. The current model is taking us to the limit, soon arriving at a point where the damage will be having irreversible impacts on and consequences for the peoples of the world.


10% of the world's richest have more than half of the global income and people in rich countries consume ten times more natural resources than in poor countries, while globally, 1 billion people are hungry, 1.6 billion have no access to electricity and more than 1 billion do not have access to safe drinking water.

The current capitalist system has led to the empowerment of transnational corporations that profit from the natural resources and speculate in the financial market, going so far as that out of the 100 largest global economies, more than 40 are trans-national.

The commitments of governments for the reduction of greenhouse gas are by far insufficient, so many regions will suffer under extreme unpredictability, where billions of people will be affected and displaced.

In the midst of this financial, energy, climate, environmental and food crises, the G8, representing the most powerful countries in the world,  with their allies as Brazil and transnational corporations are seeking to save the capitalist system through the imposition of the "green economy", rather than making changes to the structural causes of the crisis.

The civil society of Latin America and the Caribbean states:

On the proposal of the green economy
We denounce that the green economy is still pursuing to the erroneous idea of infinite economic growth in a world that has limits.

We reject the commodification of mother earth - of their life cycles and their functions, as well as payments for "environmental services" to create new financial products for the speculative market.

We denounce the green economy will not put an end to extractive industries, mining, hydrocarbons and the agro-exporting model that will continue to have negative impacts on the environment and the rights of peoples.

The green economy will strengthen the economic power of transnational corporations, being even much more influential than the more developed countries, having also self-protection mechanisms through free trade agreements, such as arbitration systems to protect their investment and future earnings, such as the ICSID.

The imposition of the green economy in Latin America and the Caribbean will be going far behind the achievements of the peoples’ struggles constituted as the right to water, the right to a healthy environment, the sovereignty and self-determination of indigenous peoples, among others.

We support the State of Acre letter signed by thirty civil society organizations in rejection of the commodification of nature and in defense of the territories. We call on the communities in other territories to be alert and to resist implementation of green economy and not to follow the example of the Government of Acre.

Facing the false solutions that are part of the proposal for a green economy, the North should take the initiative to cut greenhouse gas emissions drastically and immediately and comply with its obligations on technology transfer and financing without any conditions. The green economy is a "permit" for large industries polluting the environment.

We denounce the false solutions to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases such as nuclear energy, capture and artificial storage of carbon, GM crops and bio-fuels. Solutions to the problem the planet is facing, are not the application of new technologies, but the transformation of structural policies.

We demand the immediate stop of all projects destructive to mother earth, such as open pit mining, the exploitation of hydrocarbons in ecologically sensitive areas, the mega-projects and the IIRSA projects.

We reject any process of regional integration dominated by the big capital.

Before the negotiations of Rio + 20
We demand from the national governments to actively defend the interests of their peoples in the current negotiating text and assume responsibility for future generations. We demand the governments to not endorse the green economy and to not accept the agreements of the Rio + 20. Governments should ensure that the negotiations will be comprehensive, open and transparent.

We require national governments to defend the right to water, the rights of mother earth and the rights of indigenous peoples as expressed in the resolutions of the Peoples’ Summit on Climate Change (Tiquipaya, 2010).

We affirm the importance of upholding the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, the precautionary principle and the principle of access to information, public participation and justice.

We demand realistic and creative mechanisms such as the creation of a tax on financial transactions. It is necessary to construct instruments at the service of the people, with a system of democratic and transparent governance that promotes inclusive public policies, integration between peoples and a new model of development.

Trans-nationals of the G8, in complicity with the governments, have co-opted the UN system, have taken over the social and ecological discourse, and have greater participation in the Rio + 20 negotiations than civil society. Large private corporations have contaminated the planet most, along with the World Bank and the G20, promoting green economy and continue doing “business as usual”. Rio + 20 negotiations must be " party driven " with more participation of civil society.

Alternative models of the life - alternatives to the green economy
Living well, a holistic approach to the rights of mother earth are an alternative to the model of capitalist development, exploiting mother earth and human beings. We are not owners of the nature: we are part of mother earth and demand respect for her life cycles.

Likewise we demand governments to promote policies to support a genuine sustainable agricultural production and food sovereignty without GMOs, as the only way to stop the advance of transnational corporations profiting from the food production in the planet.

We must generate a new global alternative to the green economy to restore balance with mother earth and establish living well, with complementarity and solidarity between people and guaranty well being.

Build an alternative to the concept of "environmental services" and "natural capital" which only aim to the commodification of nature. Management and integral management of forests, water, land, among other beings of nature is a viable alternative to the philosophy of the green economy.

We demand from governments to comply with the principles of living well, stated in the declaration of civil society at a global level in the Peoples’ Summit on Climate Change Cochabamba, Bolivia, in 2010, in order to not just leaving it a speech, but elaborating specific policies for a gradual transition to overcome capitalism in all its forms.

Immediate joint actions
We call upon the international civil society to build alliances to resist the imposition of the green economy in the region and to build a new model for living well in harmony with mother earth.

The governments, communities, international cooperation and other sectors must prevent the degradation of the environment either directly or indirectly, further violations of human rights and mother earth, (water, air, land),  and must ensure the restoration of the affected areas.

Let’s mobilize towards Rio + 20 in rejection to green economy!

Let’s build alternative models to defend life and achieve the living well!


Brasil
Amazon link (Acre)

Ecuador
PIDHDD – Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo
Frente Popular
CDES – Centro de Derechos Económicos y Sociales

Nicaragua
RENICC  - Fundación Red Nicaraguense de Comercio Comunitario

Honduras
Colectivo

Chile
Plataforma Rio+20

México
Movimiento Migrante Mesoamericana

Colombia
CIASE - Corporación de Investigación y Acción Social y Económica
RLIE – Res Latinoamericana sobre las Industrias Extractivas
ILSA – Instituto Latinoamericano para una Sociedad y un Derecho Alternativos

Perú
Propuesta Ciudadana
Construyendo Puentes
CAOI – Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas

Argentina
Abogados Ambientalistas

Guatemala
Movimiento Tzuk Kim-pop (Guatemala); Centro América por el Diálogo –CAD

R. Dominicana
Alianza ONG

Red regional
Movimiento Independencia, Unidad y Cambio
Equipo de Coordinación, Red Latinoamericana de Deuda, Derechos y Desarrollo  LATINDADD

Bolivia
Academia Diplomática
ACSUR LAS SEGOVIAS
AGRUCO – Agroecología  Universidad Cochabamba
Fundación Agua Sustentable
AIPE - Asociación de Instituciones de Promoción y Educación
AMUPEI - Articulación de Mujeres por la Equidad e Igualdad
AOPEB – Asociación de Organizaciones de Productores Ecológicos de Bolvia
Asamblea del Pueblo Guaraní - APG
Asociación de Guías de Bolivia
Asociación de Regantes de Santa Cruz
Broederlijk Delen
CAFOD - Agencia oficial de la Iglesia Católica de Inglaterra y el País de Gales para el desarrollo y la ayuda en casos de emergencia
CCGTT-  Concejo de Capitanes Guaraní y Tapiete de Tarija
CDES - Centro de Derechos Económicos y Sociales
CEADESC - Centro de Estudios Aplicados a los Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales
CEDLA – Centro de Estudios para el Desarrollo Laboral Agrario
CEEDI - Centro de Estudios Ecológicos y Desarrollo Integral
CEJIS – Centro de Estudios Jurídicos e Investigación Social
CENDA – Centro de Comunicación y Desarrollo Andino
COB – Central Obrera Boliviana
Centro para la Democracia
CEPA -  Centro de Ecología y Pueblos Andinos.
CESA – Centro de Servicios Agropecuarios
CESU – Centro de Estudios Superiores Universitarios
CIDEM – Centro de Información y Desarrollo de la Mujeres
CIOEC-  Coordinadora de Integración de Organizaciones Económicas Campesinas Indígenas Originarias de Bolivia
CIPCA – Centro de Investigación y Promoción del Campesinado
CLADEM – Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer
CODEPIO-BENI  - Consejo Departamental de Pueblos Indígenas Originarios del Beni
Colectivo Cabildeo
CONAMAQ – Consejo Nacional de Ayllus y Marcas del Qullasuyo
CPILAP – Central de Pueblos Indígenas de La Paz
CRHISTIAN AID – Una Agencia Oficial de las Iglesias Británicas e Irlandesas
CSIB – Confederación Sindical de Interculturales de Bolivia
CSUTCB – Confederación Sindical Unica de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia
Democracy Center
FCA-AIS BOLIVIA -
FEDECEP-LP - La Federación Departamental de Centros y Comités Cívicos Provinciales de La Paz
Foro Indígena
FSTMB – Federación Sindical de Trabajadores Mineros de Bolivia
FSUTC-BENI – Federación Sindical Unica de Trabajadores Campesinos del Beni
Fundación CONSTRUIR
Fundación JUBILEO
Fundación SOLON
Fundación Gaia Pacha
GTCC – Grupo de Trabajo Conjunto de Cumbres
HERENCIA - Interdisciplinaria para el Desarrollo Sostenible
IESE – Instituto de Estudios Sociales y Económicos
LIDEMA – Liga de Defensa del Medio Ambiente
MOFISP - Movimiento Femenino Indoamericano Senti-Pensante
OXFAM - GB
Plataforma Boliviana Frente al cambio Climático
Plataforma Energética
PROBIOMA – Productividad Biosfera Medio Ambiente
PRODENA - Prodefensa de la Naturaleza
Programa NINA
Reacción Climática
Red de Comunicaciones Apachita
Red Habitat
REMTE – Red Latinoamericana de Mujeres Transformando la Economía
SERNAP – Servicio Nacional de Areas Protegidas
SOPE - Sociedad Potosina de Ecología
Subcentral TIPNIS – Territorio Indígena del Parque Nacional Isiboro Sécure
TROCAIRE - Agencia Católica Irlandesa para el Desarrollo
UMAVIDA –  Asociación Boliviana Uniendo Manos por la Vida
UMSA – Universidad Mayor de San Andrés
UNICOR – Universidad Cordillera
UNITAS – Unión Nacional de Instituciones para el Trabajo de Acción Social



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Peace for Life Secretariat

Tel/Fax: (+632) 9278043

http://www.peaceforlife.org



 

 



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